The latest content and news from the Barbican. Book tickets at barbican.org.uk
The latest content and news from the Barbican. Book tickets at barbican.org.uk

#igbarbican: Adeola

We look back at some of the highlights from our Instagrammer in Residence, Adeola (@hrsdee) and share some of our favourite shots.

Throughout January, she explored the sounds of the planets with gamelan expert Aloysius Suwardi, experienced gravity-defying moves with Peeping Tom’s Moeder (Mother) and hung out with Roots Raddix, Tombed Visions and Young Fathers at our Video Jam x Basquiat gig. Head to our Instagram to see her photos.

For more photographs from Adeola, follow @hrsdee and browse our Isntagrammer in Residence hashtag #igbarbican.

1/3 – I was invited by @barbicancentre to take photo’s during Aloysius Suwardi’s ‘Planet Harmonik’ rehearsals (ahead of their concert) the tones from the instruments were so soothing! In the frame is Aloysius who is an absolute musical genius. – ‘Bringing together a host of self-made instruments – from giant gambang xylophones, to hydraulic bamboo flutes – Suwardi’s Planet Harmonik takes its inspiration from the Pythagorean theory of Music of the Spheres. It’s the idea that the proportional relationship between planets is equivalent to the relationship between musical notes – that the Sun, the Moon and Earth all emit their own tone. And like the planets, it’s a piece that moves with grace despite its complexity, rooted in the rich history of gamelan while also looking to the future.’

A post shared by Adeola Adeko (@hrsdee) on

I had the pleasure of going backstage -@barbicancentre to experience the rehearsals of @peepingtomdance Mother (Moeder) and what an experience it was, the performers/choreographers are extremely talented… . . ‘Peeping Tom evoke a dreamlike universe, at once disturbing and oddly humorous, to explore an archetypal figure familiar to us all. A production of astonishing physicality that defies characterisation. . . Taking audiences into a series of recognisable spaces, including a museum, studio and maternity ward, this non-narrative work draws on the memories of director Gabriela Carrizo and her performers to trigger disquieting reflections about motherhood. . . Suffering, desire, fear, life and death are unexpectedly intertwined in Mother (Moeder), which shies away from neither the subconscious nor the stuff of nightmares, reflecting the unstable atmosphere of a David Lynch film. The soundscape has a cinematic quality, sometimes amplified to disconcerting effect. It is matched by surreal visual imagery and choreography of rare imagination where bodies bend, flip, isolate and contort.’

A post shared by Adeola Adeko (@hrsdee) on

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