The latest content and news from the Barbican. Book tickets at barbican.org.uk
The latest content and news from the Barbican. Book tickets at barbican.org.uk

Instagrammer in Residence: Elliot Nash

Monday 9 April 2018

Naïade

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Our Instagrammer in Residence project invites emerging Instagrammers from around London to experience life at the Barbican and share their photography on our social channels and also in a digital exhibition throughout the Centre.

Our April Instagrammer in Residence is Elliott (@elliotcnash), whose Instagram feed captures everyday life in a new light.

We talk to him about the Barbican and finding beauty in the mundane.

How would you describe your style of photography?

Perhaps there are commonalities which run through my photos. Maybe there is a sense of stillness, of slowness, muted tones and shadows, but I only see a series of photos which remember the everythings and the nothings of my life. The unbalanced significance they have is important to me. I might take a photo of a fleeting shadow across an indistinct wall at home to remember a thought, a photo of a friend in a foreign city to remember their company, or a photo of a mortarboard being thrown in the air to recall 3 years of architectural education.

My photos are a collection of moments which I enjoy returning to.

Another photo of a good chair and good light

A post shared by elliot nash (@elliotcnash) on

My photos are a collection of moments which I enjoy returning to

What inspires you about the Barbican and its neighbourhood?

As an architect in training, I have long found a curious beauty in the Barbican and its surroundings. It retains so well the spirit in which it was built and it is as relevant today as it ever has been. The patchwork fabric of the Barbican keeps me going back, finding the traces of time through its site.

Much needed ⚽️

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What makes a good picture?

A good awareness of light. With light, by its nature, comes colour. That is often enough for something beautiful.

What is not shown in the frame is important too, I think. Incomplete photos, which might show an empty chair, or just the feet of a person often make good pictures because they allow us to complete them with our minds over and over again.

🍎🍐

A post shared by elliot nash (@elliotcnash) on

As an architect in training, I have long found a curious beauty in the Barbican and its surroundings

Which one of your photos are you most proud of, and why?

The only photo, rather pair of photos that has made it to my wall at home comprises one taken in Berlin, and one in London, a year apart from one another. They share a composition, a scale, and the lone figure and sit well together.

Which five Instagram accounts should everyone follow?

@indiahobson for her wonderful sense of colour and light.

@rosemiller6 for beautiful photographs of simple moments spent with friends.

@johnpawson for lovely photos of nothing in particular.

@johanneaure for beautiful photos of beautiful things.

@jess.a.nash because she’s my twin sister, and she’s pretty cool.

Follow us on Instagram @barbicancentre to see more of Elliot’s photography in the coming weeks.